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Truly Collaborative Care Delivering Personalized Treatment

NBI ANXIETY SELF-TEST*

Anxiety comes in many forms and levels of severity. It is a very common psychological problem, and is found in children, teens, and adults, even seniors. Some people are excessive worriers. They engage in “what if” thinking, and anticipate “the worst” is about to happen, even though there is no real reason to assume it will. For others, anxiety is experienced in physical tenseness, which can result in head or stomach aches. Anxiety can be a steady, annoying life presence, or come in abrupt, often terrifying waves called panic attacks. Sometimes anxiety is triggered by a specific thought, only in social situations, or by a feared stimulus—like spider-phobia. Many people have some combination of these symptoms.

Do you have a problem with anxiety? You probably know the answer already, but answering the following questions and doing the suggested writing exercise may help you clarify your situation and in deciding what to do next.

There are excellent treatments available for anxiety for anyone who is ready to try them.

True or False?

  1. I believe I have a problem with anxiety. T/F
  2. My level of anxiety is distressing to me. T/F
  3. Anxiety limits enjoying my life. T/F
  4. I do what I need to, but anxiety makes it much harder. T/F
  5. I avoid doing certain activities due to anxiety. T/F
  6. I manage anxiety using “safety cues,” like sitting in a aisle seat, or in unhealthy ways. T/F
  7. Anxiety is affecting my relationships, education, or job. T/F
  8. I am open and honest with others about suffering from anxiety. T/F
  9. I am honest with myself about how anxiety is impacting my life. T/F
  10. I am committed to getting the help I need. T/F

Writing Exercise

  1. Look at your responses to the True-False questions. Now write as much or as little as you want to explain why you answered the way you did. Then, pretend you are a family member or friend that cares about you and write about what you believe they might hope you would do to help yourself.
  2. Now you can choose to write out an action plan. It could be finding out about where to get help for anxiety or telling someone you trust about what you are going through. Maybe it’s setting up that first consultation with a practitioner or practice that specializes in treating anxiety?

*This Self-Test is meant solely to increase awareness and is not intended to be used as a substitute for evaluation of anxiety by a qualified professional.

NBI Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Self-Test*

If you are reading this, it’s likely you suspect you have OCD, or know it full well, but are going back and forth in your mind for the umpteenth time about what to do.

Maybe it will help to know that many people with OCD obsess about whether they “really” have this problem or not, which delays getting the help they need, sometimes for years! Other common reasons they don’t enter treatment include feelings like embarrassment or shame, fear of the “unknown” regarding what treatment might entail, or trying to find “the perfect treatment.”

If you are exploring whether you might have OCD or are going around in circles about getting help or not, perhaps answering and then reflecting upon the following True-False questions with our suggested writing exercise can help mobilize you to take any needed actions.

OCD treatment can sound daunting, but after you do it and start to make progress, a typical reaction is, “what was I so fearful of anyway?”

True or False?

  1. I experience repetitive, negative, and unwanted thoughts, images, or sensations. T/F
  2. I try to control and suppress these thoughts and clear my mind, but it doesn’t work. T/F
  3. I engage in mental or physical behaviors to “undo” (neutralize) discomfort and fear. T/F
  4. Doing these behaviors makes me feel frustrated or lowers my self-image. T/F
  5. This process wastes my time, and impacts my schooling, work, or relationships. T/F
  6. Deep down I know my fears and behaviors are nonsensical, but I need certainty. T/F
  7. I wonder what life would be like without this mental torture. T/F
  8. I hope for a “magical,” “easy,” or “unrealistic” answer to this problem. T/F
  9. I want help, but procrastinating and doubting interfere. T/F
  10. I know my life would be better if I commit to treatment, despite indecision and fear. T/F

Writing Exercise

  1. Review and reflect on your responses to the True-False questions. Now write as much or as little as you want to explain why you answered the way you did. Then, pretend you are a family member or friend that cares about you and write about what you believe they might hope you would do to help yourself, and have a more fulfilling life.
  2. Now you can choose to write out an action plan. It could be finding out about where to get help for OCD or telling someone you trust about what you are going through. Maybe it’s setting up that first consultation with a practitioner or practice that specializes in treating OCD?

*This Self-Test is meant solely to increase awareness and is not intended to be used as a substitute for evaluation of OCD by a qualified professional.

Inspirational Stories

  • “I finally found doctors who understood me and my thoughts. I had felt so alone, helpless and scared. After meeting Dr Moritz I was at ease, she and the other doctors at NBI were all trained in the treatment of OCD.”

    M.L.

  • “The excellent care I received at the hands of NBI’s skilled and experienced practitioners made a real difference.”

    M.T.

  • “Went above and beyond for me and my family, and would not accept anything less than seeing me through to a healthy life.”

    E.S.

  • CogMed Working Memory Training
  • Association of Psychology Postdoctoral Internship Centers (APPIC
  • American Board of Professional Psychology
  • International OCD Foundation

NBI Is Dedicated

To Translating Clinical Strategies to Reality
  • Specialized Assesments

    Specialized psychological assessment and treatment for children, teens, and adults

  • Individual Treatment

    We treat a variety of conditions and offer various pathways to fit your specific needs

  • Foreign Languages

    Spanish and Portuguese speakers receive treatment in their native language

  • Trained Professionals

    Our staff is well involved in the field and focused on professional development